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Faster clonal turnover in high-infection habitats provides evidence for parasite-mediated selection
Paczesniak, D., Adolfsson, S., Liljeroos, K., Klappert, K., Lively, C. M., & Jokela, J. (2014). Faster clonal turnover in high-infection habitats provides evidence for parasite-mediated selection. Journal of Evolutionary Biology, 27(2), 417-428. https://doi.org/10.1111/jeb.12310
Infection dynamics in coexisting sexual and asexual host populations: support for the Red Queen hypothesis
Vergara, D., Jokela, J., & Lively, C. M. (2014). Infection dynamics in coexisting sexual and asexual host populations: support for the Red Queen hypothesis. American Naturalist, 184(S1), S22-S30. https://doi.org/10.1086/676886
Clonal diversity driven by parasitism in a freshwater snail
Dagan, Y., Liljeroos, K., Jokela, J., & Ben-Ami, F. (2013). Clonal diversity driven by parasitism in a freshwater snail. Journal of Evolutionary Biology, 26(11), 2509-2519. https://doi.org/10.1111/jeb.12245
The geographic mosaic of sex and infection in lake populations of a New Zealand snail at multiple spatial scales
Vergara, D., Lively, C. M., King, K. C., & Jokela, J. (2013). The geographic mosaic of sex and infection in lake populations of a New Zealand snail at multiple spatial scales. American Naturalist, 182(4), 484-493. https://doi.org/10.1086/671996
Parasites, sex, and clonal diversity in natural snail populations
King, K. C., Jokela, J., & Lively, C. M. (2011). Parasites, sex, and clonal diversity in natural snail populations. Evolution, International Journal of Organic Evolution, 65(5), 1474-1481. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1558-5646.2010.01215.x
Trematode parasites infect or die in snail hosts
King, K. C., Jokela, J., & Lively, C. M. (2011). Trematode parasites infect or die in snail hosts. Biology Letters, 7(2), 265-268. https://doi.org/10.1098/rsbl.2010.0857
The maintenance of sex, clonal dynamics, and host-parasite coevolution in a mixed population of sexual and asexual snails
Jokela, J., Dybdahl, M. F., & Lively, C. M. (2009). The maintenance of sex, clonal dynamics, and host-parasite coevolution in a mixed population of sexual and asexual snails. American Naturalist, 174(S1), S43-S53. https://doi.org/10.1086/599080
Hybrid fitness in a locally adapted parasite
Dybdahl, M. F., Jokela, J., Delph, L. F., Koskella, B., & Lively, C. M. (2008). Hybrid fitness in a locally adapted parasite. American Naturalist, 172(6), 772-782. https://doi.org/10.1086/592866