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Infection dynamics in coexisting sexual and asexual host populations: support for the Red Queen hypothesis
Vergara, D., Jokela, J., & Lively, C. M. (2014). Infection dynamics in coexisting sexual and asexual host populations: support for the Red Queen hypothesis. American Naturalist, 184(S1), S22-S30. https://doi.org/10.1086/676886
The geographic mosaic of sex and infection in lake populations of a New Zealand snail at multiple spatial scales
Vergara, D., Lively, C. M., King, K. C., & Jokela, J. (2013). The geographic mosaic of sex and infection in lake populations of a New Zealand snail at multiple spatial scales. American Naturalist, 182(4), 484-493. https://doi.org/10.1086/671996
Wide variation in ploidy level and genome size in a New Zealand freshwater snail with coexisting sexual and asexual lineages
Neiman, M., Paczesniak, D., Soper, D. M., Baldwin, A. T., & Hehman, G. (2011). Wide variation in ploidy level and genome size in a New Zealand freshwater snail with coexisting sexual and asexual lineages. Evolution, International Journal of Organic Evolution, 65(11), 3202-3216. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1558-5646.2011.01360.x
Hybrid fitness in a locally adapted parasite
Dybdahl, M. F., Jokela, J., Delph, L. F., Koskella, B., & Lively, C. M. (2008). Hybrid fitness in a locally adapted parasite. American Naturalist, 172(6), 772-782. https://doi.org/10.1086/592866
Allochronic differentiation among <I>Daphnia</I> species, hybrids and backcrosses: the importance of sexual reproduction for population dynamics and genetic architecture
Jankowski, T., & Straile, D. (2004). Allochronic differentiation among Daphnia species, hybrids and backcrosses: the importance of sexual reproduction for population dynamics and genetic architecture. Journal of Evolutionary Biology, 17(2), 312-321. https://doi.org/10.1046/j.1420-9101.2003.00666_17_2.x
No evidence for adaptive micro-evolution to a decrease in phosphorus-loading of a <I>Daphnia</I> population inhabiting a pre-alpine lake
Spaak, P., & Keller, B. (2004). No evidence for adaptive micro-evolution to a decrease in phosphorus-loading of a Daphnia population inhabiting a pre-alpine lake. Hydrobiologia, 526(1), 15-21. https://doi.org/10.1023/B:HYDR.0000041618.25389.ec