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Forest microclimates and climate change: importance, drivers and future research agenda
De Frenne, P., Lenoir, J., Luoto, M., Scheffers, B. R., Zellweger, F., Aalto, J., … Hylander, K. (2021). Forest microclimates and climate change: importance, drivers and future research agenda. Global Change Biology, 27(11), 2279-2297. https://doi.org/10.1111/gcb.15569
Specialists and generalists fulfil important and complementary functional roles in ecological processes
Dehling, D. M., Bender, I. M. A., Blendinger, P. G., Böhning-Gaese, K., Muñoz, M. C., Neuschulz, E. L., … Stouffer, D. B. (2021). Specialists and generalists fulfil important and complementary functional roles in ecological processes. Functional Ecology. https://doi.org/10.1111/1365-2435.13815
Direct and indirect effects of rorest anthropogenic disturbance on above and below ground communities and litter decomposition
Laigle, I., Moretti, M., Rousseau, L., Gravel, D., Venier, L., Handa, I. T., … Aubin, I. (2021). Direct and indirect effects of rorest anthropogenic disturbance on above and below ground communities and litter decomposition. Ecosystems. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10021-021-00613-z
Plant functional trait shifts explain concurrent changes in the structure and function of grassland soil microbial communities
Boeddinghaus, R. S., Marhan, S., Berner, D., Boch, S., Fischer, M., Hölzel, N., … Manning, P. (2019). Plant functional trait shifts explain concurrent changes in the structure and function of grassland soil microbial communities. Journal of Ecology, 107(5), 2197-2210. https://doi.org/10.1111/1365-2745.13182
Traditional plant functional groups explain variation in economic but not size-related traits across the tundra biome
Thomas, H. J. D., Myers-Smith, I. H., Bjorkman, A. D., Elmendorf, S. C., Blok, D., Cornelissen, J. H. C., … van Bodegom, P. M. (2019). Traditional plant functional groups explain variation in economic but not size-related traits across the tundra biome. Global Ecology and Biogeography, 28, 78-95. https://doi.org/10.1111/geb.12783
Below-ground resource partitioning alone cannot explain the biodiversity-ecosystem function relationship: a field test using multiple tracers
Jesch, A., Barry, K. E., Ravenek, J. M., Bachmann, D., Strecker, T., Weigelt, A., … Scherer-Lorenzen, M. (2018). Below-ground resource partitioning alone cannot explain the biodiversity-ecosystem function relationship: a field test using multiple tracers. Journal of Ecology, 106(5), 2002-2018. https://doi.org/10.1111/1365-2745.12947
Positive diversity-functioning relationships in model communities of methanotrophic bacteria
Schnyder, E., Bodelier, P. L. E., Hartmann, M., Henneberger, R., & Niklaus, P. A. (2018). Positive diversity-functioning relationships in model communities of methanotrophic bacteria. Ecology, 99(3), 714-723. https://doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2138
Wood decay rates of 13 temperate tree species in relation to wood properties, enzyme activities and organismic diversities
Kahl, T., Arnstadt, T., Baber, K., Bässler, C., Bauhus, J., Borken, W., … Gossner, M. M. (2017). Wood decay rates of 13 temperate tree species in relation to wood properties, enzyme activities and organismic diversities. Forest Ecology and Management, 391, 86-95. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foreco.2017.02.012
Historical and recent land use affects ecosystem functions in subtropical grasslands in Brazil
Leidinger, J. L. G., Gossner, M. M., Weisser, W. W., Koch, C., Rosadio Cayllahua, Z. L., Podgaiski, L. R., … Meyer, S. T. (2017). Historical and recent land use affects ecosystem functions in subtropical grasslands in Brazil. Ecosphere, 8(12), e02032 (20 pp.). https://doi.org/10.1002/ecs2.2032
Holocene changes in climate and land use drove shifts in the diversity of testate amoebae in a subalpine pond
Oris, F., Lamentowicz, M., Genries, A., Mourier, B., Blarquez, O., Ali, A. A., … Carcaillet, C. (2013). Holocene changes in climate and land use drove shifts in the diversity of testate amoebae in a subalpine pond. Journal of Paleolimnology, 49(4), 633-646. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10933-013-9680-3
Shrub expansion in tundra ecosystems: dynamics, impacts and research priorities
Myers-Smith, I. H., Forbes, B. C., Wilmking, M., Hallinger, M., Lantz, T., Blok, D., … Hik, D. S. (2011). Shrub expansion in tundra ecosystems: dynamics, impacts and research priorities. Environmental Research Letters, 6(4), 045509 (15 pp.). https://doi.org/10.1088/1748-9326/6/4/045509
Understanding species and community response to environmental change - a functional trait perspective
Wellstein, C., Schröder, B., Reineking, B., & Zimmermann, N. E. (2011). Understanding species and community response to environmental change - a functional trait perspective. Agriculture, Ecosystems and Environment, 145(1), 1-4. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.agee.2011.06.024
Taxonomical vs. functional responses of bee communities to fire in two contrasting climatic regions
Moretti, M., de Bello, F., Roberts, S. P. M., & Potts, S. G. (2009). Taxonomical vs. functional responses of bee communities to fire in two contrasting climatic regions. Journal of Animal Ecology, 78(1), 98-108. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2656.2008.01462.x
Quantitative estimates of coarse woody debris and standing dead trees in selected Swiss forests
Bretz Guby, N. A., & Dobbertin, M. (1996). Quantitative estimates of coarse woody debris and standing dead trees in selected Swiss forests. Global Ecology and Biogeography Letters, 5(6), 327-341. https://doi.org/10.2307/2997588