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The alien Chinese windmill palm (<em>Trachycarpus fortunei</em>) impacts forest vegetation and regeneration on the southern slope of the European Alps
Fehr, V., Conedera, M., Fratte, M. D., Cerabolini, B., Benedetti, C., Buitenwerf, R., … Pezzatti, G. B. (2024). The alien Chinese windmill palm (Trachycarpus fortunei) impacts forest vegetation and regeneration on the southern slope of the European Alps. Applied Vegetation Science, 27, e12765 (14 pp.). https://doi.org/10.1111/avsc.12765
Socio-ecological evidence highlights that native<em> Prosopis</em> species are better for arid land restoration than non-native ones
Sharifian, A., Niknahad–Gharmakher, H., Foladizada, M., Tabe, A., & Shackleton, R. T. (2023). Socio-ecological evidence highlights that native Prosopis species are better for arid land restoration than non-native ones. Restoration Ecology, 31(2), e13756 (9 pp.). https://doi.org/10.1111/rec.13756
Consensus and controversy in the discipline of invasion science
Shackleton, R. T., Vimercati, G., Probert, A. F., Bacher, S., Kull, C. A., & Novoa, A. (2022). Consensus and controversy in the discipline of invasion science. Conservation Biology, 36(5), e13931 (13 pp.). https://doi.org/10.1111/cobi.13931
Iconic but invasive: the public perception of the Chinese windmill palm (<em>Trachycarpus fortunei</em>) in Switzerland
Tonellotto, M., Fehr, V., Conedera, M., Hunziker, M., & Pezzatti, G. B. (2022). Iconic but invasive: the public perception of the Chinese windmill palm (Trachycarpus fortunei) in Switzerland. Environmental Management, 70, 618-632. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00267-022-01646-3
Approaches for estimating benefits and costs of interventions in plant biosecurity across invasion phases
Welsh, M. J., Turner, J. A., Epanchin-Niell, R. S., Monge, J. J., Soliman, T., Robinson, A. P., … Brockerhoff, E. G. (2021). Approaches for estimating benefits and costs of interventions in plant biosecurity across invasion phases. Ecological Applications, 31(5), e02319 (18 pp.). https://doi.org/10.1002/eap.2319